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Ask for Information, not Answers

One of my favorite parts of my job is troubleshooting. I enjoy troubleshooting issues for users, and I enjoy helping my coworkers troubleshoot issues they encounter. There’s just something satisfying about seeing a mysterious problem and picking it apart until you find the cause.

As a result, people sometimes ask me how to get better at troubleshooting. It’s a hard skill to explain — sometimes it feels like I just know the correct solution to a problem, and sometimes it feels like I’m just intuiting where the issue lies. Those aren’t really helpful to someone who wants to improve, and the truth is that I didn’t walk into this job with all of the answers or intuition I have today. So where does it come from?

One key that I realized is that to be good at troubleshooting, you have to be curious. Specifically, you have to ask questions (either literally asking another person or just asking yourself as a step in the process) with the intent to learn, not just the intent to get an answer for the one problem you are currently facing. Whether you’re getting help or you’re eavesdropping on someone else who’s troubleshooting an issue (also a great way to learn!), here are things to consider:

  1. How did someone else break down the issue I’m looking at and approach or investigate it?
  2. What is the general subject underlying this issue, and what information can I brush up on (with further reading, classes, conversations with experts) that will help me solve an issue related to that subject later on?
  3. What keywords (error messages, feature names, descriptions of the problem) can I use to search for past occurrences of this issue?
  4. What tools do I have access to that could possibly give me more information about the problem that underlies this issue?

A lot of the time, my troubleshooting is a lot of trial and error. I might pop open my browser console to discover it’s completely blank, and later find out that my terminal could have given me more useful information. Or I’ll be absolutely sure I’m encountering a theme bug, only to discover that the problem is solved by changing a widget. That’s ok.

Learning to troubleshoot is learning how to approach a problem, and going down the wrong path is bound to happen in that process. But the more practice you get, and the more techniques and information you learn, the better you’ll become at identifying the likely cause of any given issue and figuring out how to resolve it — without having to rely on someone else handing you the right answer.

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Excellence Wrangler for Automattic, the company behind WordPress.com. Linguaphile and Translator. Tester.

2 Comments

  1. To curiosity, I would add persistence. Wilingness to test everything is another extremely helpful trait in troubleshooting–sometimes it’s a pain, but if you like being able to solve mysteries from code, then it’s worth it.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This is really good. When I hire people to test software, who have not tested before, I look for curiosity and troubleshooting ability. I have a handful of interview questions that let a candidate talk about these things. Someone who’s comfortable working on a computer, and is curious and has some innate troubleshooting ability can be taught to test.

    I really like Sheri’s comment about persistence and will add that to my criteria for an entry-level tester.

    Liked by 1 person

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